Publications – Main Series

The Main Series consists of editions and translations of Old, Middle and Early Modern Irish texts.

A limited number of specially boxed gift sets are available.

 

1 GIOLLA AN FHIUGHA: The Lad of the Ferule, Eachtra Cloinne; Rígh na h-Ioruaidhe: Adventures of the Children of the King of Norway

Edited by Douglas Hyde (first published 1899)

xx + 208 pp. 1998. ISBN 1 870 16601 9

This first volume of the Main Series, which was edited, appropriately enough, by the Irish Texts Society's first President, Douglas Hyde, contains two tales belonging to the so-called cycle of romantic tales. The earliest examples of these tales date to the fifteenth century, but they are very common in the later manuscript literature of the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Of the two tales edited by Hyde, one, the Adventures of the Sons of the King of Norway, probably dates to the seventeenth century, whereas the other, the Lad of the Ferule, may not be earlier than about 1800.
A new Introduction to the edition, provided by Máire Ní Mhaonaigh in 1998, includes a full discussion of the thematic structure, style, and manuscript tradition of both tales.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

2 FLED BRICEND: The Feast of Bricriu: An early Gaelic Saga transcribed from older mss. into the Book of the Dun Cow ... with conclusions from Gaelic ms. xl. Edinburgh Advocates Library

Edited by George Henderson (first published 1899)

lxviii + 218 pp. ISBN 1870 16602

The story of Bricriu's Feast, which is one of the best known tales of the Ulster or heroic cycle, is based on two separate motifs, the 'Hero's Portion' and the 'Champion's Bargain'. These motifs link the Celts of Ireland with those of Gaul who, according to the Greek writer Posidonius, told similar tales. Also, through survivals in Arthurian literature, they provide a link with the British Celts. Henderson 's volume, although calling out for a new editor, remains the standard edition of this text. Reassessments of the tale provided by various scholars to the annual seminar of the Society, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 1999, were published in Subsidiary Series No. 10, edited by Pádraig Ó Riain.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

3 DÁNTA AODHAGÁIN UÍ RATHAILLE: The Poems of Egan O'Rahilly

Edited by Patrick S. Dinneen and Tadgh O'Donoghue (first published 1911)

lxii + 360 pp. ISBN 1 870 166035

The Society's publication of these poems in 1900, edited by P. S. Dinneen, represented the first scholarly edition of the complete works of any Irish poet and, as Breandán Ó Buachalla pointed out in his new introduction to the volume (also separately published in the Society's Subsidiary Series No. 15 in 2004), the 'touchstone by which all future editions of Irish poetry could be judged'. A second, much augmented, edition of this volume was published in 1911, under the joint editorship of Dinneen and Tadhg O'Donoughue (Torna). Summing up Ó Rathaille's achievement, Ó Buachalla stated: 'the local, the national, the personal, mesh inextricably as he depicts in well-crafted imaginative verse a poet's world that is out of joint'.
This volume contains Breandán Ó Buachalla's new introduction (2004).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

4 FORAS FEASA AR ÉIRINN: The History of Ireland by Geoffrey Keating D.D. Vol 1.

Edited by David Comyn (first published 1901)

xviii + 238 pp. ISBN 1 870 166043

This work, written by the Tipperary priest, Geoffrey Keating (Seathrún Céitinn), between c 1618 and 1634, has been described as 'the most influential of all works of Gaelic historiography'. Drawing upon the annals, Lebor Gabála, and the various story cycles of early Irish literature, Keating provided an account of the history of Ireland from the earliest times to the coming of the Normans, an event which marked the beginning of the presence of his own people on the island. Keating set the standard for Early Modern Irish prose and, in the early days of the Gaelic League, there were some who advocated the adoption of his style as the standard of Modern Irish.
In his foreword to the 1987 reprint of these volumes, Breandán Ó Buachalla wrote: 'Not only did Keating successfully assimilate in one continuous narrative the various strata and components of traditional lore ..., but he masterfully recast that narrative in an intelligible modern idiom.' This volume contains Brendán Ó Buachalla's new introduction (1987).
See also Main Series 8, 9, and 15 for volumes 2, 3, 4.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

5 CAITHRÉIM CONGHAIL CLÁIRINGHNIGH: Martial Career of Conghal Cláiringhneach

Edited by Patrick M. MacSweeny (first published 1904)

lxviii + 234 pp. ISBN 1 870 16605 1

As with Volume 1 of the Series, the story of the martial career of 'Flat-nailed Conghal' belongs to the romantic cycle of Irish story-telling. However, like 'the Pursuit of Gruaidh Grian-Sholus' (Vol. 24 below), it features characters belonging to the heroic cycle of Ulster tales. After completing warrior deeds in Norway, England (where King Arthur was involved), and Rathlin, Conghal attained the kingship of Ireland . The ideals of heroism, physical endurance, and equity are extolled in the tale. This volume, prepared for the Society by Patrick M. MacSweeney, represents the only edition of the text.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

6 IMTHEACHTA AENIASA: The Irish Aeneid being a Translation, made before A.D. 1400, of the xii Books of Virgil's Aeneid into Gaelic

Edited by George Calder (first published 1907)

xx + 238 pp. ISBN 1 870 16606 X

This text represents an attempt by a medieval Irish writer to adapt Virgil's Aeneid to an Irish prose form. Erich Poppe, who provided the volume with a new introduction in 1995, views Imtheachta Aeniasa as 'the product of the fusion of a developed vernacular stylistic and narrative tradition with a learned and historiographical interest in the events of classical antiquity'. This text, and the Irish adaptation of the story of Hercules (Stair Ercuil, Vol. 38 below), were made the subject of the Society's annual seminar held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 2005. The papers given at the seminar is published in Subsidiary Series No. 17, edited by Kevin Murray.
This volume contains Erich Poppe's new introduction (1995)

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

7 DUANAIRE FINN: The Book of the Lays of Fionn. Irish Text with Translation. Part 1 (See Vols 28 & 43)

Edited by Eoinn MacNeill (first published 1908)

lxviii + 208 pp. ISBN 1 870 16607 8

With the appearance in 1908 of the first volume of Duanaire Finn, edited by Eoin MacNeill, Tadhg O'Donoghue (Torna) wrote: 'It is books of this kind that show what great work is being done by the Irish Texts Society'. Alas, forty-five years were to pass before the third and final volume, edited by Gerard Murphy, was to be published. This final volume has been described by John Carey, who edited a Subsidiary Series volume of Reassessments of Duanaire Finn in 2003 (No. 13), as 'a formidable and enduring monument of Irish scholarship'. The Duanaire consists of a collection of poetic texts relating to Fionn mac Cumhaill and the Fianna assembled by Aodh Ó Dochartaigh in Ostend in 1627 for the use of Captain Somhairle Mac Domhnaill of Clann Domhnaill of the Route in county Antrim. As Ruairí Ó hUiginn stated, it was this commission, rather than any of his military exploits, 'that ensured that Mac Domhnaill's name and fame would endure'.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

8 FORAS FEASA AR ÉIRINN: The History of Ireland by Geoffrey Keating D.D. Vol II

Edited by Patrick S. Dinneen (first published 1908)

xxxvi + 426 pp. ISBN 1 870 16608 6

This work, written by the Tipperary priest, Geoffrey Keating (Seathrún Céitinn), between c 1618 and 1634, has been described as 'the most influential of all works of Gaelic historiography'. Drawing upon the annals, Lebor Gabála, and the various story cycles of early Irish literature, Keating provided an account of the history of Ireland from the earliest times to the coming of the Normans, an event which marked the beginning of the presence of his own people on the island. Keating set the standard for Early Modern Irish prose and, in the early days of the Gaelic League, there were some who advocated the adoption of his style as the standard of Modern Irish.
In his foreword to the 1987 reprint of these volumes, Breandán Ó Buachalla wrote: 'Not only did Keating successfully assimilate in one continuous narrative the various strata and components of traditional lore ..., but he masterfully recast that narrative in an intelligible modern idiom.' This volume contains Brendán Ó Buachalla's new introduction (1987).
See also Main Series 4, 9, and 15 for volumes 1, 3, 4.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

9 FORAS FEASA AR ÉIRINN: The History of Ireland by Geoffrey Keating D.D. Vol. III

Edited by Patrick S. Dinneen (first published 1908)

viii + 388 pp. ISBN 1 870 16609 4

This work, written by the Tipperary priest, Geoffrey Keating (Seathrún Céitinn), between c 1618 and 1634, has been described as 'the most influential of all works of Gaelic historiography'. Drawing upon the annals, Lebor Gabála, and the various story cycles of early Irish literature, Keating provided an account of the history of Ireland from the earliest times to the coming of the Normans, an event which marked the beginning of the presence of his own people on the island. Keating set the standard for Early Modern Irish prose and, in the early days of the Gaelic League, there were some who advocated the adoption of his style as the standard of Modern Irish.
In his foreword to the 1987 reprint of these volumes, Breandán Ó Buachalla wrote: 'Not only did Keating successfully assimilate in one continuous narrative the various strata and components of traditional lore ..., but he masterfully recast that narrative in an intelligible modern idiom.' This volume contains Brendán Ó Buachalla's new introduction (1987).
See also Main Series 4, 8, and 15 for volumes 1, 2, 4.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

10 TWO IRISH ARTHURIAN ROMANCES: Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaoil, Eachtra Mhacaoimh-an-Iolair. The story of The Crop Eared Dog, the Story of Eagle Boy

Edited by R.A. Stewart Macalister (first published 1908)

x + 208 pp. ISBN 1 870 16610 8

The tales featured in this volume, which was edited by R. A. S. Macalister, are examples of Irish Arthurian literature. However, as Joseph Falaky Nagy pointed out in 1998 in his new Introduction to Macalister's edition, these Irish stories, are, like the romantic tales to which they belong, 'the product of confluence and mutual reinforcement between the native and foreign sources available to the author-storyteller'. Among the native sources of these essentially romantic tales were the stories of Fionn and the Fianna. Nagy's new introduction is accompanied by an appendix edited from a critical review by T. F. O'Rahilly of the original edition, which does much to remedy the all too evident deficiencies of Macalister's editorial policies.
This volume contains a new introduction by Joseph Falaky Nagy (1997)

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

11 DUANAIRE DHÁIBHIDH UÍ BHRUADAIR: The Poems of David Ó Bruadair Part I, containing poems down to the year 1666

Edited by John C. MacErlean (first published 1910)

lii + 208 pp. ISBN 1 870 16611 6

These three volumes, first published by the Society between 1910 and 1917, and edited by John C MacErlean, still form the most comprehensive edition of the works of this major late seventeenth-century poet. The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature has this to say of Ó Bruadair: 'Along with the poetry of Pádraigín Haicéad and the prose text Pairlement Chloinne Tomáis, his verse registers the chaos that engulfed Gaelic Ireland in the seventeenth century, recording its emotional impact on a highly charged sensibility'.
Reassessments by various scholars of Ó Bruadair and his poems were published in the Society's Subsidiary Series No. 11, edited by Pádraigín Riggs, in 2001.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

12 BUILE SUIBHNE: (The Frenzy of Suibhne) Being the Adventures of Suibhne Geilt: A Middle Irish Romance

Edited by J. G. O'Keeffe (first published 1913)

xxxviii + 198 pp. ISBN 1 870 16612 4

This tale is the product of a late twelfth-century monastic scriptorium, possibly that of Armagh. Whoever its author may have been, he brought together a number of traditions to form a coherent and highly artistic composition, the verse of which has been described by Joseph Falaky Nagy, who provided a new introduction in 1996, as 'a remarkable adventure in the inner workings of the persona of the poet as he vacillates between power and powerlessness'. As several modern literary works, among others by Flann O'Brien, Seán Ó Tuama and Séamus Heaney, show, Suibhne's remarkable adventure continues to inspire. J. G. O'Keeffe provided the only full modern edition of this very influential text.
This volume contains a new introduction by Joseph Falaky Nagy (1996)

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

13 DUANAIRE DHÁIBHIDH UÍ BHRUADAIR: The Poems of David Ó Bruadair Part II, containing poems from the years 1667 till 1682

Edited by John C. MacErlean (first published 1913)

xl + 288 pp. ISBN 1 870 16613 2

These three volumes, first published by the Society between 1910 and 1917, and edited by John C. MacErlean, still form the most comprehensive edition of the works of this major late seventeenth-century poet. The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature has this to say of Ó Bruadair: 'Along with the poetry of Pádraigín Haicéad and the prose text Pairlement Chloinne Tomáis, his verse registers the chaos that engulfed Gaelic Ireland in the seventeenth century, recording its emotional impact on a highly charged sensibility'.
Reassessments by various scholars of Ó Bruadair and his poems were published in the Society's Subsidiary Series No. 11, edited by Pádraigín Riggs, in 2001.
See Vol. 11 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

14 AN IRISH ASTRONOMICAL TRACT: Based in part on a Medieval Latin version of a work by Messahalah.

Edited by Maura Power (first published 1914)

xviii + 176 pp. ISBN 1 870 16614 0

This volume, edited by Maura Power, is one of the very few texts of its kind that has been published in a critical edition. As Ms Power pointed out in her preface to the edition, 'the translations of medieval Latin texts into Irish, probably for use as text-books in the schools of the 14th and 15th centuries, would supply material for special study'. This text was adapted into Irish from a Latin translation of an Arabic treatise by Messahalah, a Jewish astronomer who lived in Alexandria before 800 A.D.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

15 FORAS FEASA AR ÉIRINN: The History of Ireland by Geoffrey Keating D.D. Part IV, containing the Genealogies, Synchronisms with an Index, which includes the elucidation of place names and annotations to the text of Vols. I, II and III

Edited by Patrick S. Dinneen (first published 1914)

484 pp. ISBN 1 870 16615 9

This work, written by the Tipperary priest, Geoffrey Keating (Seathrún Céitinn), between c 1618 and 1634, has been described as 'the most influential of all works of Gaelic historiography'. Drawing upon the annals, Lebor Gabála, and the various story cycles of early Irish literature, Keating provided an account of the history of Ireland from the earliest times to the coming of the Normans, an event which marked the beginning of the presence of his own people on the island. Keating set the standard for Early Modern Irish prose and, in the early days of the Gaelic League, there were some who advocated the adoption of his style as the standard of Modern Irish.
In his foreword to the 1987 reprint of these volumes, Breandán Ó Buachalla wrote: 'Not only did Keating successfully assimilate in one continuous narrative the various strata and components of traditional lore ..., but he masterfully recast that narrative in an intelligible modern idiom.' This volume contains Brendán Ó Buachalla's new introduction (1987).
See also Main Series 4, 8, 9, and 15 for volumes 1, 2, and 3.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

16 LIFE OF ST. DECLAN OF ARDMORE AND LIFE OF ST. MOCHUDA OF LISMORE:

Edited by P. Power (first published 1914)

xxxii + 202 pp. ISBN 1 870 16616 7

These vernacular lives of saints, connected with two of the historically most important Waterford churches, were edited by one of the most eminent historians ever produced by that county. Otherwise well known for his History of the Diocese of Lismore and Waterford and his Placenames of the Déise, Power applied his vast knowledge of Waterford's local history to his edition of the two saints's Lives. While the Latin lives of the two saints have since been edited by Charles Plummer, who also edited the vernacular Life of Mochuda, Power's edition is still of value. As Brian Ó Cuív pointed out, it also marked a 'welcome extension' of the range of material being published by the Society.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

17 AMHRÁIN CHEARBHALLÁIN: The Poems of Carolan, together with other N. Connacht and S. Ulster Lyrics

Edited by Tomás Ó Maille (first published 1916)

xviii + 424 pp. ISBN 1 870 16617 5

This is the only volume edited for the Society by Tomás Ó Máille, former holder of the chair of Irish at University College Galway. It is also a unique volume in another respect, representing the only departure from the Society's first general rule which requires that all texts be accompanied by an English translation. Of all the authors whose works were published by the Society, Carolan, who was a harper as well as a poet, is arguably the best known, largely because of his musical compositions. This volume has been chosen as the subject of the Society's annual seminar for 2006, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC (Subsidiary Series No. 18).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

18 DUANAIRE DHÁIBHIDH UÍ BHRUADAIR: The Poems of David Ó Bruadair Part III, containing poems from the year 1682 till the poet's death in 1698

Edited by John C. MacErlean (first published 1917)

xvi + 276 pp. ISBN 1 870 16618 3

These three volumes, first published by the Society between 1910 and 1917, and edited by John C. MacErlean, still form the most comprehensive edition of the works of this major late seventeenth-century poet. The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature has this to say of Ó Bruadair: 'Along with the poetry of Pádraigín Haicéad and the prose text Pairlement Chloinne Tomáis, his verse registers the chaos that engulfed Gaelic Ireland in the seventeenth century, recording its emotional impact on a highly charged sensibility'.
Reassessments by various scholars of Ó Bruadair and his poems were published in the Society's Subsidiary Series No. 11, edited by Pádraigín Riggs, in 2001.
See Vol. 11 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

19 GABHÁLTAIS SHEARLUIS MHÓIR: The Conquest of Charlemagne

Edited by Douglas Hyde (first published 1919)

xvi + 128 pp. + iv ISBN 1 870 16619 1

The 'Conquests of Charlemagne', a fourteenth- or fifteenth-century Irish adaptation of a Latin original, was edited by the Society's President, Douglas Hyde (later to become the first President of Ireland), from the fifteenth-century vellum manuscript, the Book of Lismore. Writing of this text, Nessa Ní Shéaghdha described it as a 'refreshing and sensitive' translation, made with the aim of rendering the story concise and readable by omitting long-winded and tedious passages.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

20 IOMARBHÁGH NA BHFILEADH: The Contention of the Bards Part I

Edited by L. McKenna (first published 1920)

xxx + 177 pp. ISBN 1 870 16620 5

The bardic poems contained in Lambert McKenna's two-volume edition of the Iomarbhágh ostensibly reflect an argument between groups of Irish poets in the early 1600s as to which was superior, the southern half of Ireland or its northern counterpart.
However, in his new introduction, published in 1994, Joep Leerssen wrote that it represented more than a final display of bardic erudition and eloquence, 'it was also a unique registration of an ancient literary tradition trying to come to terms with the drastic disintegration of both its social raison d'être and its cultural Weltanschauung'.
This volume contains a new introduction by Joep Leerssen (1994).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

21 IOMARBHÁGH NA BHFILEADH: The Contention of the Bards Part II

Edited by L. McKenna (first published 1920)

178-284 pp. ISBN 1 870 16621 3

The bardic poems contained in Lambert McKenna's two-volume edition of the Iomarbhágh ostensibly reflect an argument between groups of Irish poets in the early 1600s as to which was superior, the southern half of Ireland or its northern counterpart.
However, in his new introduction, published in 1994, Joep Leerssen wrote that it represented more than a final display of bardic erudition and eloquence, 'it was also a unique registration of an ancient literary tradition trying to come to terms with the drastic disintegration of both its social raison d'être and its cultural Weltanschauung'.
This volume contains a new introduction by Joep Leerssen (1994).
See Vol. 20 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

22 A BHFUIL AGUINN DÁR CHUM TADHG DALL Ó HUIGINN: The Bardic Poems of Tadhg Dall Ó hUiginn (1550-1591) Vol I, Text.

Edited by Eleanor Knott (first published 1922)

cviii + 280 pp. ISBN 1 870 16622 1

In his new introduction to Eleanor Knott's two-volume edition of the poems of Tadhg Dall Ó Huiginn, Pádraig A. Breatnach stated that 'the work is at once the single most comprehensive scholarly account from primary sources of the life and works of an Irish poet, and also provides an exemplary model, establishing thoroughly grounded principles of editorial method for such studies in the future'. Among the features of Miss Knott's masterly introduction is a very valuable account of the bardic poets and their work. The poems are addressed to patrons who lived in the period 1560-1590. The poet, Tadhg Dall, was a native of North-East Connacht and, after a prosperous life, may have been murdered by some members of the O'Hara family in 1591.
This volume contains a new introduction by P. A. Breatnach (1997).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

23 A BHFUIL AGUINN DÁR CHUM TADHG DALL Ó HUIGINN: The Bardic Poems of Tadhg Dall Ó hUiginn (1550-1591) Vol II, Translation

Edited by Eleanor Knott (first published 1926)

viii + 360 pp. ISBN 1 870 16623 X

In his new introduction to Eleanor Knott's two-volume edition of the poems of Tadhg Dall Ó Huiginn, Pádraig A. Breatnach stated that 'the work is at once the single most comprehensive scholarly account from primary sources of the life and works of an Irish poet, and also provides an exemplary model, establishing thoroughly grounded principles of editorial method for such studies in the future'. Among the features of Miss Knott's masterly introduction is a very valuable account of the bardic poets and their work. The poems are addressed to patrons who lived in the period 1560-1590. The poet, Tadhg Dall, was a native of North-East Connacht and, after a prosperous life, may have been murdered by some members of the O'Hara family in 1591.
This volume contains a new introduction by P.A. Breatnach (1997).
See Vol. 22 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

24 TÓRUIGHEACHT GRUAIDHE GRIANSHOLUS: The Pursuit of Gruaidh Grian-Sholus

Edited by Cecile O'Rahilly (first published 1924)

xxx + 158 pp. ISBN 1 870 16624 8

The story of the pursuit of Gruaidh Grian-Sholus belongs to the romantic cycle of Irish story-telling. However, like 'the Martial Career of Flat-nailed Conghal' (Vol. 5 above), it features characters, such as the main hero, Cú Chulainn, and Fearghus mac Rosa, who belong to the heroic cycle of Ulster tales. This edition was Cecile O'Rahilly's first encounter with a text featuring Cú Chulainn; she was later to become the foremost authority on the tales of the heroic cycle and the editor of several recensions of Táin Bó Chuailnge, including that of the Book of Leinster (Vol. 49 below). Her excellent introduction to this volume includes an account of the 'Cú Chulainn cycle' of tales in its later phases.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

25 ROSA ANGLICA SEU ROSA MEDICINAE JOHANNIS ANGLICI: An Early Modern Irish Translation of Part of John of Gaddesden's Text-Book of Medieval Medicine

Edited by Winifred P. Wulff (first published 1929)

lviii + 436 pp. ISBN 1 870 16625 6

This tract is a translation from Latin into Irish of a medical text written in 1314 by John of Gaddesden. The Irish translation, possibly made about 1400 by Nicholas O'Hickey, a member of a well known medical family, reads easily, is clear and to the point. Its value has been described by its editor, Winifred Wulff, as 'chiefly lexicographical' and as representative of a vast body of manuscript material containing 'great resources in scientific and medical terminology and expression'. Miss Wulff's introduction explores, among many other aspects of the text, the subject of hereditary physicians in Ireland, Scotland, and Wales . The same editor was preparing for the Society an edition of an Irish translation of Hortus Sanitatis Hibernicus, the so-called Herbal Volume but, very unfortunately, this remained uncompleted.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

26 CAITHRÉIM THOIRDHEALBHAIGH: The Triumphs of Turlough Vol I , Text

Edited by Standish Hayes O'Grady (first published 1929)

xvi + 238 pp. ISBN 1 870 16626 4

As Brian Ó Cuív pointed out, this volume is unique among the Society's publications in as much as it had originally been prepared for publication by Cambridge University Press, when its editor, Standish Hayes O'Grady, died in 1915. However, it remained unpublished until the Society took it over, with Robin Flower, who also provided a short introduction, seeing it through the press. A very important historical source, the Caithréim was written, probably by a professional poet-historian of the McGrath family, in the interests of a branch of the O'Briens of Thomond. It contains a stirring account of O'Brien resistance to the advance of the Normans in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It is also an excellent example of the flowery style preferred by prose writers of this period. The two volumes contain several important indexes relating, among others, to the O'Briens, Burkes and Butlers.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

27 CAITHRÉIM THOIRDHEALBHAIGH: The Triumphs of Turlough Vol II, Translation

Edited by Standish Hayes O'Grady (first published 1929)

vi + 252 pp. ISBN 1 870 16627 2

As Brian Ó Cuív pointed out, this volume is unique among the Society's publications in as much as it had originally been prepared for publication by Cambridge University Press, when its editor, Standish Hayes O'Grady, died in 1915. However, it remained unpublished until the Society took it over, with Robin Flower, who also provided a short introduction, seeing it through the press. A very important historical source, the Caithréim was written, probably by a professional poet-historian of the McGrath family, in the interests of a branch of the O'Briens of Thomond. It contains a stirring account of O'Brien resistance to the advance of the Normans in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It is also an excellent example of the flowery style preferred by prose writers of this period. The two volumes contain several important indexes relating, among others, to the O'Briens, Burkes and Butlers.
See Vol. 26 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

28 DUANAIRE FINN: The Book of the Lays of Fionn. Irish Text with Translation. Part II

Edited by Gerard Murphy (first published 1933)

xx + 410 pp. ISBN 1 870 16628 0

With the appearance in 1908 of the first volume of Duanaire Finn, edited by Eoin MacNeill, Tadhg O'Donoghue (Torna) wrote: 'It is books of this kind that show what great work is being done by the Irish Texts Society'. Alas, forty-five years were to pass before the third and final volume, edited by Gerard Murphy, was to be published. This final volume has been described by John Carey, who edited a Subsidiary Series volume of Reassessments of Duanaire Finn in 2003 (No. 13), as 'a formidable and enduring monument of Irish scholarship'. The Duanaire consists of a collection of poetic texts relating to Fionn mac Cumhaill and the Fianna assembled by Aodh Ó Dochartaigh in Ostend in 1627 for the use of Captain Somhairle Mac Domhnaill of Clann Domhnaill of the Route in county Antrim. As Ruairí Ó hUiginn stated, it was this commission, rather than any of his military exploits, 'that ensured that Mac Domhnaill's name and fame would endure'.
See Vol. 7 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

29 INSTRUCTIO PIE VIVENDI ET SUPERNA MEDITANDI: Instruction in Holy Life and Heavenly Thought. Vol. I, Latin and Irish versions with Glossary of Irish Words

Edited by John MacKechnie (first published 1934)

xiv + 230 + 8 pp. ISBN 1 870 16629 9

The manuscript of this work was discovered in the nineteenth century 'in an inside wall about fourteen inches thick in the Hoar Abbey at Cashel'. The text, edited by John MacKechnie, is a treatise on the monastic life addressed by a spiritual advisor to a nun. It has been described as 'possibly the dullest of the Society's publications'!

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

29A INSTRUCTIO PIE VIVENDI ET SUPERNA MEDITANDI: Instruction in Holy Life and Heavenly Thought. Vol. II, English Translation of the Irish version

Edited by John MacKechnie (first published 1946)

xvi + 112 pp. ISBN 1 870 16699 X

The manuscript of this work was discovered in the nineteenth century 'in an inside wall about fourteen inches thick in the Hoar Abbey at Cashel'. The text, edited by John MacKechnie, is a treatise on the monastic life addressed by a spiritual advisor to a nun. It has been described as 'possibly the dullest of the Society's publications'!
See Vol. 29.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

30 CINNLAE AMHLAOIBH UÍ SHÚILEABHÁIN: The Diary of Humphrey O'Sullivan. Part I, containing the Diary from 1st January, 1827 to the end of August, 1828.

Edited by Michael McGrath (first published 1936)

lii + 336 pp. ISBN 1 870 16630 2

Written from January 1827 to July 1835, the diary of Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin of Callan, County Kilkenny, has been described as one of the most significant non-imaginative Irish prose writings of the nineteenth century. It is certainly an extremely valuable source of information on the manners and customs of the ordinary people of the period. Tomás de Bhaldraithe noted: 'the struggle for Catholic Emancipation, the Tithe War, the secret societies, evictions, famine and cholera plagues...are frequently mentioned in the diary. [He] gives regular accounts of markets, prices and wages. He mentions many festival customs, games, sports meetings, patterns, wakes, dances, dinner parties et cetera, in addition to his daily notes on the weather, the crops, bird, animal and plant life, which were among his principal interests'.
Father McGrath's four volumes, which represent the standard edition of the diary, were made the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Irish Departments at UCC in 2003. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Liam P. Ó Murchú in Subsidiary Series No. 14. Concluding his contribution to the seminar, Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh described the Cínn Lae as a 'remarkable document', which offers us an invaluable insight into the mentalité of the historically conscious Catholic bourgeoisie during what was the crucial decade of its emergence.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

31 CINNLAE AMHLAOIBH UÍ SHÚILEABHÁIN: The Diary of Humphrey O'Sullivan Part II, containing the Diary from 1st September, 1828 to the end of December, 1830

Edited by Michael McGrath (first published 1936)

vi + 374 pp. ISBN 1 870 16631 0

Written from January 1827 to July 1835, the diary of Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin of Callan, County Kilkenny, has been described as one of the most significant non-imaginative Irish prose writings of the nineteenth century. It is certainly an extremely valuable source of information on the manners and customs of the ordinary people of the period. Tomás de Bhaldraithe noted: 'the struggle for Catholic Emancipation, the Tithe War, the secret societies, evictions, famine and cholera plagues...are frequently mentioned in the diary. [He] gives regular accounts of markets, prices and wages. He mentions many festival customs, games, sports meetings, patterns, wakes, dances, dinner parties et cetera, in addition to his daily notes on the weather, the crops, bird, animal and plant life, which were among his principal interests'.
Father McGrath's four volumes, which represent the standard edition of the diary, were made the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Irish Departments at UCC in 2003. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Liam P. Ó Murchú in Subsidiary Series No. 14. Concluding his contribution to the seminar, Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh described the Cínn Lae as a 'remarkable document', which offers us an invaluable insight into the mentalité of the historically conscious Catholic bourgeoisie during what was the crucial decade of its emergence.
See Vol. 30.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

32 CINNLAE AMHLAOIBH UÍ SHÚILEABHÁIN: The Diary of Humphrey O'Sullivan Part III, containing the Diary from 1st January, 1831 to the end of December 1833

Edited by Michael McGrath (first published 1937)

xvi + 272 pp. ISBN 1 870 16632 9

Written from January 1827 to July 1835, the diary of Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin of Callan, County Kilkenny, has been described as one of the most significant non-imaginative Irish prose writings of the nineteenth century. It is certainly an extremely valuable source of information on the manners and customs of the ordinary people of the period. Tomás de Bhaldraithe noted: 'the struggle for Catholic Emancipation, the Tithe War, the secret societies, evictions, famine and cholera plagues...are frequently mentioned in the diary. [He] gives regular accounts of markets, prices and wages. He mentions many festival customs, games, sports meetings, patterns, wakes, dances, dinner parties et cetera, in addition to his daily notes on the weather, the crops, bird, animal and plant life, which were among his principal interests'.
Father McGrath's four volumes, which represent the standard edition of the diary, were made the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Irish Departments at UCC in 2003. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Liam P. Ó Murchú in Subsidiary Series No. 14. Concluding his contribution to the seminar, Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh described the Cínn Lae as a 'remarkable document', which offers us an invaluable insight into the mentalité of the historically conscious Catholic bourgeoisie during what was the crucial decade of its emergence.
See Vol. 30.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

33 CINNLAE AMHLAOIBH UÍ SHÚILEABHÁIN: The Diary of Humphrey O'Sullivan. Part IV, containing the Diary for 1834-1835 (to July), Poems, Miscellaneous Sketches, Vocabularies, etc.

Edited by Michael McGrath (first published 1937)

xlvi + 392 pp. ISBN 1 870 16633 7

Written from January 1827 to July 1835, the diary of Amhlaoibh Ó Súilleabháin of Callan, County Kilkenny, has been described as one of the most significant non-imaginative Irish prose writings of the nineteenth century. It is certainly an extremely valuable source of information on the manners and customs of the ordinary people of the period. Tomás de Bhaldraithe noted: 'the struggle for Catholic Emancipation, the Tithe War, the secret societies, evictions, famine and cholera plagues...are frequently mentioned in the diary. [He] gives regular accounts of markets, prices and wages. He mentions many festival customs, games, sports meetings, patterns, wakes, dances, dinner parties et cetera, in addition to his daily notes on the weather, the crops, bird, animal and plant life, which were among his principal interests'.
Father McGrath's four volumes, which represent the standard edition of the diary, were made the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Irish Departments at UCC in 2003. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Liam P. Ó Murchú in Subsidiary Series No. 14. Concluding his contribution to the seminar, Gearóid Ó Tuathaigh described the Cínn Lae as a 'remarkable document', which offers us an invaluable insight into the mentalité of the historically conscious Catholic bourgeoisie during what was the crucial decade of its emergence.
See Vol. 30.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

34 LEBOR GABÁLA ÉRENN: The Book of the Taking of Ireland, Part I

Edited by R. A. S. Macalister (first published 1938)

xxxiv + 270 pp. ISBN 1 870 16634 5

This late eleventh-century text contains a record of the legendary history of Ireland. John Carey, who provided the Society's five-volume edition by R.A. S. Macalister with a new introduction in 1993, described the text as 'a sweeping, unified account of the origins of Ireland and of the Gaels, extending from the creation of the world down to the time of writing'. Originally consisting of a collection of poems by several writers, the author fitted these into a prose framework which paraphrased and elaborated upon the verse. And as John Carey also stated, while Macalister's edition has been deservedly critized for its many faults, and not least for its lack of an index, it continues for the present to be an indispensable work for all interested in this enormous repository of tradition.
This volume contains John Carey's new introduction (1993).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

35 LEBOR GABÁLA ÉRENN: The Book of the Taking of Ireland, Part II

Edited by R. A. S. Macalister (first published 1939)

viii + 274 pp. ISBN 1 870 16635 3

This late eleventh-century text contains a record of the legendary history of Ireland. John Carey, who provided the Society's five-volume edition by R.A. S. Macalister with a new introduction in 1993, described the text as 'a sweeping, unified account of the origins of Ireland and of the Gaels, extending from the creation of the world down to the time of writing'. Originally consisting of a collection of poems by several writers, the author fitted these into a prose framework which paraphrased and elaborated upon the verse. And as John Carey also stated, while Macalister's edition has been deservedly critized for its many faults, and not least for its lack of an index, it continues for the present to be an indispensable work for all interested in this enormous repository of tradition.
This volume contains John Carey's new introduction (1993).
See Vol. 34.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

36 SGÉALTA THOMÁIS UÍ CHATHASAIGH: Mayo Stories told by Thomas Casey. Hull Memorial Volume

Edited by Douglas Hyde (first published 1939)

xxiv + 388 pp. ISBN 1 870 16636 1

The title page of this remarkable volume bears two much honoured names within the annals of the Society, the first of which, Eleanor Hull, commemorates the Society's first Hon. Secretary, who served in that position from 1897 until her death in 1935. The second is that of the editor, Douglas Hyde, who held the office of President of the Society, then purely honorary, from 1898 to his death in 1953. However, the title page records his much more elevated title of (first) President of Ireland, an office to which he had been elected in 1938, while this Memorial Volume was going through the press. His choice of Mayo stories was not welcomed universally, with one critic unfairly describing it as trash. While a similar Memorial Volume was planned for P. S. Dinneen, this was to be the only one published by the Society.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

37 AITHDIOGHLUIM DÁNA: A Miscellany of Irish Bardic Poetry, Historical and Religious, including the Historical Poems of the Duanaire in the Yellow Book of Lecan. Vol I, Introduction and Text

Edited by Lambert McKenna S.J. (first published 1939)

xxxvi + 362 pp. ISBN 1 870 16637 X

These two volumes contain a miscellany of Irish bardic poetry, historical and religious, which was drawn partly from the historical poems of the Duanaire in the Yellow Book of Lecan. The compositions edited here illustrate the various periods, styles and metres practised by the filí. The editor, Lambert McKenna, was a noted authority on this type of poetry. He also edited for the Society a two-volume collection of bardic poems entitled Iomarbhágh na bhFileadh The Contention of the Bards (vols 20, 21). Accompanying the text of the present volumes are extensive notes and glossaries.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

38 STAIR ERCUIL OCUS A BÁS: The Life and Death of Hercules

Edited by Gordon Quinn (first published 1939)

xl + 264 pp. ISBN 1 870 16638 8

Gordon Quinn's edition of this tale, justly described as excellent by Brian Ó Cuív, brought to the attention of a wider public the last of the notable Irish versions of the Greek myth of Hercules. This version, adapted in the fifteenth century from an English translation by Caxton of a French original, was described by the editor as a 'thoroughly Irish' tale, apart, of course from its central theme. This volume, together with the Irish adaptation of the Aeneid (Vol. 6 above), were made the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 2005. The papers given at the seminar is published in Subsidiary Series No. 17, edited by Kevin Murray.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

39 LEBOR GABÁLA ÉRENN: The Book of the Taking of Ireland, Part III

Edited by R. A. S. Macalister (first published 1940)

vi + 206 pp. ISBN 1 870 16639 6

This late eleventh-century text contains a record of the legendary history of Ireland. John Carey, who provided the Society's five-volume edition by R.A. S. Macalister with a new introduction in 1993, described the text as 'a sweeping, unified account of the origins of Ireland and of the Gaels, extending from the creation of the world down to the time of writing'. Originally consisting of a collection of poems by several writers, the author fitted these into a prose framework which paraphrased and elaborated upon the verse. And as John Carey also stated, while Macalister's edition has been deservedly critized for its many faults, and not least for its lack of an index, it continues for the present to be an indispensable work for all interested in this enormous repository of tradition.
This volume contains John Carey's new introduction (1993).
See Vol. 34.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

40 AITHDIOGHLUIM DÁNA: A Miscellany of Irish Bardic Poetry, Historical and Religious, including the Historical Poems of the Duanaire in the Yellow Book of Lecan. Vol II, Translations, Notes, Vocabulary

Edited by Lambert McKenna S.J. (first published 1940)

vi + 364 pp. ISBN 1 870 16640 X

These two volumes contain a miscellany of Irish bardic poetry, historical and religious, which was drawn partly from the historical poems of the Duanaire in the Yellow Book of Lecan. The compositions edited here illustrate the various periods, styles and metres practised by the filí. The editor, Lambert McKenna, was a noted authority on this type of poetry. He also edited for the Society a two-volume collection of bardic poems entitled Iomarbhágh na bhFileadh The Contention of the Bards (vols 20, 21). Accompanying the text of the present volumes are extensive notes and glossaries.
See Vol. 37 (Vol. I).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

41 LEBOR GABÁLA ÉRENN: The Book of the Taking of Ireland, Part IV

Edited by R. A. S. Macalister (first published 1941)

vi + 342 pp. ISBN 1 870 16641 8

This late eleventh-century text contains a record of the legendary history of Ireland. John Carey, who provided the Society's five-volume edition by R.A. S. Macalister with a new introduction in 1993, described the text as 'a sweeping, unified account of the origins of Ireland and of the Gaels, extending from the creation of the world down to the time of writing'. Originally consisting of a collection of poems by several writers, the author fitted these into a prose framework which paraphrased and elaborated upon the verse. And as John Carey also stated, while Macalister's edition has been deservedly critized for its many faults, and not least for its lack of an index, it continues for the present to be an indispensable work for all interested in this enormous repository of tradition.
This volume contains John Carey's new introduction (1993).
See Vol. 34.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

42 BEATHA AODHA RUAIDH UÍ DHOMHNAILL: The Life of Aodh Ruadh O Domhnaill. Part I, Text and Translation

Edited by Paul Walsh (first published 1948)

xii + 350 pp. ISBN 1 870 16642 6

This work, written about 1616 by Lughaidh Ó Cléirigh, narrates the events of Aodh Ruadh's life, from his capture and imprisonment in Dublin Castle in 1587 to his death in Spain in 1602. It focuses particularly on the period of the 'Nine Years War', including the battle of Kinsale (1601), seeing in the latter the loss of 'the authority and sovereignty of the Gaels of Ireland to the end of time.' As such, it is one of the few native sources to have covered in detail the events that culminated in the battle of Kinsale. Combining the traditional modes of Gaelic narrative with the novel features of Renaissance biography, the real aim of this literary and political document, according to Mícheál Mac Craith, was to further the martial career of Aodh Ruadh's nephew. Its editor, Paul Walsh, was one of the most productive Irish scholars of the early twentieth century.
His edition of the Life of Aodh Ruadh was the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 2001. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Pádraig Ó Riain in Subsidiary Series No. 12.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

43 DUANAIRE FINN: Part III, Introduction, Notes, Appendices, Indexes and Glossary

Edited by Gerard Murphy, Anne O'Sullivan, Idris L. Foster, Brendan Jennings (first published 1953)

cxxii + 452 pp. ISBN 1 870 16643 4

With the appearance in 1908 of the first volume of Duanaire Finn, edited by Eoin MacNeill, Tadhg O'Donoghue (Torna) wrote: 'It is books of this kind that show what great work is being done by the Irish Texts Society'. Alas, forty-five years were to pass before the third and final volume, edited by Gerard Murphy, was to be published. This final volume has been described by John Carey, who edited a Subsidiary Series volume of Reassessments of Duanaire Finn in 2003 (No. 13), as 'a formidable and enduring monument of Irish scholarship'. The Duanaire consists of a collection of poetic texts relating to Fionn mac Cumhaill and the Fianna assembled by Aodh Ó Dochartaigh in Ostend in 1627 for the use of Captain Somhairle Mac Domhnaill of Clann Domhnaill of the Route in county Antrim. As Ruairí Ó hUiginn stated, it was this commission, rather than any of his military exploits, 'that ensured that Mac Domhnaill's name and fame would endure'.
See Vol. 7 for Vol. I.and 28 Vol. II.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

44 LEBOR GABÁLA ÉRENN: The Book of the Taking of Ireland, Part V

Edited by R. A. S. Macalister (first published 1956)

viii + 508 pp. ISBN 1 870 16644 2

This late eleventh-century text contains a record of the legendary history of Ireland. John Carey, who provided the Society's five-volume edition by R.A. S. Macalister with a new introduction in 1993, described the text as 'a sweeping, unified account of the origins of Ireland and of the Gaels, extending from the creation of the world down to the time of writing'. Originally consisting of a collection of poems by several writers, the author fitted these into a prose framework which paraphrased and elaborated upon the verse. And as John Carey also stated, while Macalister's edition has been deservedly critized for its many faults, and not least for its lack of an index, it continues for the present to be an indispensable work for all interested in this enormous repository of tradition.
This volume contains John Carey's new introduction (1993).
See Vol. 34 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

45 BEATHA AODHA RUAIDH UÍ DHOMHNAILL: The Life of Aodh Ruadh O Domhnaill. Part II, Introduction, Glossary, etc.

Edited by Paul Walsh, Colm Ó Lochlainn (first published 1957)

viii + 468 pp. ISBN 1 870 16645 0

This work, written about 1616 by Lughaidh Ó Cléirigh, narrates the events of Aodh Ruadh's life, from his capture and imprisonment in Dublin Castle in 1587 to his death in Spain in 1602. It focuses particularly on the period of the 'Nine Years War', including the battle of Kinsale (1601), seeing in the latter the loss of 'the authority and sovereignty of the Gaels of Ireland to the end of time.' As such, it is one of the few native sources to have covered in detail the events that culminated in the battle of Kinsale. Combining the traditional modes of Gaelic narrative with the novel features of Renaissance biography, the real aim of this literary and political document, according to Mícheál Mac Craith, was to further the martial career of Aodh Ruadh's nephew. Its editor, Paul Walsh, was one of the most productive Irish scholars of the early twentieth century.
His edition of the Life of Aodh Ruadh was the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 2001. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Pádraig Ó Riain in Subsidiary Series No. 12.
See Vol. 42 for Vol. I.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

46 LEBOR NA CERT: The Book of Rights

Edited by Myles Dillon (first published 1962)

xxvi + 200 pp. ISBN 1 870 16646 9

Since its first edition for the Celtic Society by the great John O'Donovan in 1847, the Book of Rights had been regarded as one of the most authoritative sources for the study of early Irish history. However, many notable scholars, such as Eoin MacNeill and T. F. O'Rahilly, cast doubt on its antiquity. And, as the editor of the volume for the Irish Texts Society, Myles Dillon, who was also the Society's President, showed, the text was compiled in the late eleventh century, much later than previously thought, probably as a means of promoting the political interests of Munster. By making the present edition available, Dillon performed what Brian Ó Cuív has described as a notable service to Irish studies, for even if of less importance than was thought, the text is still full of interest.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

47 THE POEMS OF BLATHMAC SON OF CÚ BRETTAN TOGETHER WITH THE IRISH GOSPEL OF THOMAS AND A POEM ON THE VIRGIN MARY:

Edited by James Carney (first published 1964)

xl + 170 pp. ISBN 1 870 16647 7

The discovery and edition for the Irish Texts Society by James Carney of this unique collection of early Irish poetry represented one of the most significant developments in Irish studies of the twentieth century. The verse provides an unrivalled insight into the early Irish reception of Biblical narratives, and into the religious mentalité of the early centuries of Christianity. The Gospel of Thomas text is of particular value to the history of the spread of apocryphal writings in Western Europe.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

48 TÓRUIGHEACHT DHIARMADA AGUS GHRÁINNE: The Pursuit of Diarmaid and Gráinne

Edited by Nessa Ní Shéaghdha (first published 1967)

xxxii + 148 pp. ISBN 1 870 16648 5

The Tóruigheacht, which involves the tragedy of a young girl betrothed to an old man, is one of the best known and best loved tales of the Fionn cycle, which in turn was the most popular of Irish storytelling cycles. One measure of the tale's popularity is the number of 'Beds of Diarmuid and Gráinne' dotted around the Irish countryside. Another is the number of manuscripts of the Tóruigheacht, at least forty-one, ranging in date from 1718 to 1850. The excellent introduction to this volume by its editor Nessa Ní Shéaghdha discusses, among other aspects of the tale, its survival in many folk versions.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

49 TÁIN BÓ CÚALNGE FROM THE BOOK OF LEINSTER:

Edited by Cecile O'Rahilly (first published 1969)

lvi + 356 pp. ISBN 1 870 16649 3

Representing the only recension of the famous epic which has been worked into a unified and harmonized whole, this twelfth-century version of the Táin set the standard of prose in Irish for several centuries. Also, unlike earlier recensions, this version of the Táin found place for the celebrated 'Pillow-Talk' of Medb and Ailill. Its editor, Cecile O'Rahilly, was a noted authority on the Táin. This volume, the second edited by her for the Society (see also Vol. 24), is exceptional in that it was simultaneously published by the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies.
The Society's volume is thus for sale to members only.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

50 CATH MAIGE MUCRAMA: The Battle of Mag Mucrama

Edited by Máirín O Daly (first published 1975)

viii + 158 pp. ISBN 1 870 16650 7

Despite the reference to a single tale in its title, in fact the volume contains editions of four texts, all of them bearing on the legendary conflict between Mac Con, heir to the kingship of Corcu Loígde of South Munster, and Ailill Ólum and his son Eogan of the central plain of the same province. Eogan was the eponymous ancestor of the Eoganachta, who controlled the kingship of Munster over a period of several centuries, and one of the tales here edited, Scéla Eogain, contains the origin legend of this family. The edition, by Máirín O Daly, has been described by Brian Ó Cuív as exemplary.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

51 THE POEMS OF GIOLLA BRIGHDE MAC CONMIDHE

Edited by Nicholas Williams (first published 1980)

iv + 386 pp. ISBN 1 870 16651 5

This is one of the very few editions of an entire corpus of bardic poems by a single poet to have been published up to now, another being Eleanor Knott's edition for this Society of the poems of Tadhg Dall Ó Huiginn (Vols 22, 23). The poet, Giolla Brighde, belongs in the early thirteenth century, and, as such, is representative of the beginning of the bardic period proper. His poems are thus not only of a high artistic quality but also of considerable historical value. N. J. A. William's edition and translation of the twenty-two poems is accompanied by very extensive notes to the text.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

52 CATH MAIGE TUIRED: The Second Battle of Mag Tuired

Edited by Elizabeth A. Gray (first published 1982)

vi + 142 pp. ISBN 1 870 16652 3

This volume, edited for the Society by Elizabeth A. Gray, is the only modern edition of one of the key texts of the mythological cycle of Irish storytelling. The story of the epic battle between the Tuatha Dé Danann and the Fomoire, although written in the Old Irish period, is preserved only in a sixteenth-century manuscript. Set within the framework of early Irish pseudo-history, as contained in the Lebor Gabála Érenn (Vols 34, 35, 39, 41, 44 above) the tale is in fact, as the editor points out, timeless. Moreover, its basic theme of a battle between the gods is often compared with similar stories in Scandinavian and Indic traditions. More than any other Irish tale, therefore, it has attracted the attention of non-Irish specialists in mythology, such as Jan de Vries and Georges Dumézil. Dr Gray's edition is acoompanied by extensive notes on the various Irish divinities featured in the tale.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

53 POEMS ON MARCHER LORDS: From a Sixteenth-Century Tipperary Manuscript

Edited by Anne O'Sullivan, Pádraig Ó Riain (first published 1987)

xxviii + 146 pp. ISBN 1 870 16653 1

This collection of bardic poems, which is found in a manuscript from the Cashel district, reflects the literary taste of a march area of the Butler lordship at the beginning of the sixteenth century. The elegies for local lords, both native and Hiberno-Norman, reveal the extent of the cultural synthesis which had taken place by then, and also present a very valuable insight into the social circumstances of the time. This edition of the poems for the Society was begun by Anne O'Sullivan, who had previously edited one of the poems separately, and, after her death in 1984, completed by Pádraig Ó Riain.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

54 BETHA ADAMNÁIN: The Irish Life of Adamnán

Edited by Máire Herbert, Pádraig Ó Riain (first published 1988)

xii + 110 pp. ISBN 1 870 16654 X

The vernacular Life of Adamnán of Iona, here edited by Máire Herbert and Pádraig Ó Riain, is one of the latest of the pre-Norman biographies of Irish saints. It was written about 950, probably at Kells in co. Meath, which had by then taken over from Iona as the leading Columban church. The Life addresses issues of obvious topical importance to this church, such as its relations with mostly local kings.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

55 STAIR NICOMÉID: The Irish Gospel of Nicodemus

Edited by Ian Hughes (first published 1991)

xlvi + 138 pp. ISBN 1 870 16655 8

The apocryphal gospel, edited here for the Society by Ian Hughes, is a very good specimen of this type of writing, which became popular in Ireland and elsewhere from the twelfth century onwards. The Irish adaptation is based on two Latin texts dealing with Christ's Passion and Trial by Pontius Pilate and His descent into Hell. This volume is accompanied by a memorial notice of the Society's Hon. Secretary, Noel O'Connell, who died in 1991 while it was going through the press.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

56 OIDHEADH CHLOINNE hUISNEACH: The Violent Death of the Children of Uisneach

Edited by Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith (first published 1992)

220 pp. ISBN 1 870 16656 6

Although the Middle Irish version of this tale, one of the so-called réamhscéalta of the Táin, was among the volumes proposed for publication by the Society as early as 1898, this never came to fruition. However, the present volume contains an edition of the Early Modern Irish version of the tale, which is often referred to as the Deirdre story. One of the most popular of the group of late medieval Gaelic Romances, collectively known as the 'Three Sorrows of Storytelling', the Deirdre story has served as an inspiration for many modern writers, including W. B. Yeats and James Stephens. The edition and translation of the Irish text by Dr Caoimhín Mac Giolla Léith is accompanied by a lengthy introduction, which explores the relationship between this text and other versions of the Deirdre Story.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

57 BEATHA BHARRA: Saint Finnbarr of Cork: The Complete Life

Edited by Pádraig Ó Riain (first published 1994)

xviii + 322 pp. ISBN 1 870 16657 4

The editor of this volume, Pádraig Ó Riain, provides a comprehensive edition of the various Lives, Irish and Latin, of St Finbarr, patron of the church and diocese of Cork . The Lives written for the saint range in date from about 1200 to the early seventeenth century, and there are more manuscripts of the later version than of any other Irish saint's Life. Besides considering previous work on the saint, this volume contains a full discussion of the manuscript tradition of each of Finbarr's Lives. The publication of the volume engendered a considerable amount of controversy, and dismay, especially in Cork, where the editor's thesis that the saint had in fact never set foot in the south of Ireland, was given a cool reception. The evidence for Professor Ó Riain's view that Finbarr of Cork was identical with Finnian of Movilla in Co. Down is set out in the first chapter of the companion volume, The Making of a Saint: Finbarr of Cork 600-1200, published in Subsidiary Series No. 5. which also contains an interpretation of the historical circumstances that gave rise to the production of the saint's Life.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

58 BAILE IN SCÁIL: The Phantom's Frenzy

Edited by Kevin Murray (first published 2004)

180 pp. ISBN 1 870 16658 2

This new edition of the early Irish vision tale, Baile in Scáil, prepared for the Society by Kevin Murray of the Department of Early and Medieval Irish at UCC, provides a modern treatment of a text last edited by the great German scholar, Rudolf Thurneysen, in 1935. Dr Murray's analysis of the text throws considerable new light on its origins and development. The tale is set on the ramparts of the hill of Tara, which is presented as a gateway to the Otherworld. Here Conn 'of the hundred battles' is said to have met the 'Sovereignty of Ireland' in the form of a beautiful maiden, and for every drink that she gave him, the god Lug named a future king of Ireland. The text thus bears important, and highly interesting, witness to the early Irish interpretation of kingship.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

59 CÓIR ANMANN: A Late Middle Irish Treatise on Personal Names Part 1

Edited by Sharon Arbuthnot (first published 2005)

vii + 248 pp. ISBN 1 870 16659 0

This volume is the first part of a new critical edition of the Middle Irish text Cóir Anmann , 'Fitness of Names'. The only previous edition of this fascinating text, which is full of lore on the origin of the names of famous people, was by Whitley Stokes in 1897. The text, which is characteristic of medieval Irish interest in names, has been variously described as a handbook and as a storehouse of personal name and epithet explanations. Dr Arbuthnot's comprehensive edition contains much new material, which adds to the importance of the volume. The second part, which contains an edition of the latest version of the text, described by the editor as a 'greater Cóir Anmann ' is published as Vol. 60 of the Main Series.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

60 CÓIR ANMANN: A Late Middle Irish Treatise on Personal Names Part 2

Edited by Sharon Arbuthnot (first published 2006)

viii + 217 pp. ISBN 1 870 16660 4

In the previous volume (Vol. 59), Part 1 of the edition, Dr Sharon Arbuthnot edited two versions of this fascinating text, which deals with the traditions surrounding some of the more important names of early Irish literature and mythology. She also explores in Part 1 the relationship between these two versions and a third, by far the longest, version, an edition and translation of which she now provides in Part 2. Last edited by Stokes in 1897, Dr Arbuthnot's critical edition, now complete, will doubtless also stand the test of time.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

61 BRUIDEN DA CHOCA: The Hostel of Da Coca

Edited by Gregory Toner (first published 2007)

xii + 296 pp. ISBN 1 870 16661 2

The tragic story of Cormac Connloinges, son of Conchobar mac Nessa, was last edited in 1900. The present edition by Professor Gregory Toner reflects the enormous advances since made in Irish scholarship. A lengthy introduction, translation, and full critical apparatus accompany the edition. The editor dates the work to the early twelfth century. Moreover, he presents a very persuasive argument for a Clonmacnoise provenance, and for use on the part of the author of the monastery's extensive library, then comprising, among other manuscripts, Lebor na Uidre (The Book of the Dun Cow).

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

62 LIGE GUILL THE GRAVE OF GOLL: A Fenian Poem from the Book of Leinster

Edited by Diarmuid Ó Murchadha (first published 2009)

xl + 104 pp. ISBN 1 870 16662 1

Lige Guill is the last to be edited of a number of Fenian poems brought together by the compiler of the Book of Leinster. Described by the editor as a 'somewhat bloodthirsty literary work,' the poem nonetheless represents an important and welcome addition to the corpus of edited Fianaigecht texts, not least because of its large onomastic content. Diarmuid Ó Murchadha was an authority on Irish personal and place names, and in this edition he used his vast experience of dealing with often perplexing onomastic problems to the full.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

63 LEBOR GABÁLA ÉRENN: The Book of the Taking of Ireland Part 6, Index of Names

Compiled by Pádraig Ó Riain (first published 2009)

vi + 137 pp. ISBN 1 870 16663 9

R.A.S Macalister's five-volume edition of Lebor Gabála Érenn , published by the Irish Texts Society (Vols 34, 35, 39, 41, 44) has traditionally been regarded as both unsatisfactory and incomplete, not least because the editor was no longer alive to see the final volume through the press. It is no more than proper, therefore, that the Irish Texts Society should respond to a long-felt need by providing an Index of Names. The index of personal names is limited in character, being confined to names of primary persons, animals and some inanimate objects mentioned in the text, accompanied, wherever appropriate, by patronymics or metronymics, which are also indexed separately. Subject to the omission of such repeatedly cited names as Ére (Ireland), the section on placenames is designed to be complete.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

64 CATH CLUANA TARBH: The Battle of Clontarf

Edited by Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail (2011)

x + 309 pp. ISBN 1 870 16664 7

In this volume, Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail provides a critical edition of Cath Cluana Tarbh, one of the most popular prose texts to be transmitted in the post-classical corpus of Irish manuscripts. She also provides a comprehensive introductory essay in which she explores the complex nature of textual transmission and composition in Ireland during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Drawing on the manuscript evidence of Cath Cluana Tarbh, Dr Ní Úrdail calls into question the fixity or permanence of the scribal text in the post-classical Modern Irish period, and argues for a dynamic process of conscious transmission determined by its carriers and transmitters, the scribes themselves. The variability of the sources of a text such as Cath Cluana Tarbh alerts us to the continuity between a scribe's labours as a copyist on the one hand and as an inventive author on the other, whose creative sense was provoked by his activity in dealing with texts.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

65 TWO TEXTS ON LOCH NECHACH: DE CAUSIS TORCHI CORC'ÓCHE AND AIDED ECHACH MAIC MAIREDA

Edited by Ranke de Vries (2012)

xii + 328pp. ISBN 978 187016 665 2

This volume, edited by Ranke de Vries, contains editions of two important texts related to the mythological origin of Lough Neagh and its aftermath. The earlier of the two texts, De causis, contains a seventh-century poem by Luccreth moccu Chíara that can be regarded as the earliest example of deibide. The second, Aided Echach, is a prosimetric text found only in Lebor na hUidre (in the hand of the interpolator H). The editions are preceded by a general discussion on the development of the tradition concerning the origin of the lake.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

   

   

 

66 ANATHOMIA GYDO

Edited by Eithne Ní Ghallchobhair (first published 2014)

vi + 187 pp. ISBN 1 870 166 66 3

Anathomia Gydo is the only surviving medieval surgical text to have been translated into Early Modern Irish. The work consists of thirteen chapters and it follows the order of the original Latin text written by the famous French doctor, Guy de Chauliac (c. 1295-1368). Its modern significance, however, lies more in the socio-historical and lexical information it provides that in its medical content. This is the first time that this work has been edited and made available with an English translation.

    

Buy online at the RIA shop

Price: €42 (members €28) + postage

 

 


   

 

Boxed Gift Sets

Foras Feasa ar Éirinn (main series volumes 4, 8, 9, 15)
€180 (members €120) + postage

Cinnlae Amlaoibh Uí Shúileabháin (main series volumes 30, 31, 32, 33)
€180 (members €120) + postage

Beatha Aodha Ruaidh Uí Dhomhnaill (main series volumes 42, 45)
€100 (members €66) + postage

Lebor Gabála Érenn (main series volumes 34, 35, 39, 41, 44, 63)
€270 (members €180) + postage

Duanaire Finn (volumes 7, 28, 43)
€150 (members €100) + postage

Boxed Sets Postage: €12 (island of Ireland); €20 (Europe incl. Britain); €20 (rest of world).

To order boxed gift sets: download the publications order form, print, complete and enclose with your payment.

 


   

 

The Society publishes texts in three series: Main, Subsidiary and Other publications.

Members, whether Individual or Full Library, enjoy significant discounts on ITS publications — see Membership for details.
Existing members should either use the Royal Irish Academy shop (credit and debit cards) or download an publications order form to send with your payment by cheque or bank draft.